Research at UW

 

 

 

 

 

The University of Wisconsin has several active research groups with projects focused on bumble bees – ranging from basic ecology of nesting behavior and foraging patterns, to applied research into the efficacy of bumble bees as pollinators of crops. Below we profile some of the cutting-edge work led by researchers from Entomology, Integrative Biology,  Botany, and the UW Arboretum.

Bumble Bee Researchers

Taylor Tai

PhD Student

tmtai@wisc.edu

1552 University Ave
3120 WEI
Madison, WI 53726

Taylor Tai is a graduate student in the Gratton Lab whose work focuses on bumble bee nest-founding and hibernation. Because these stages of the life cycle occur below ground for many species, little is known about how queens choose suitable nests in the spring or how their survival is impacted by winter conditions. Taylor conducts fieldwork with both common and threatened bumble bees to address these questions and inform land use practices that are sensitive to the needs of native pollinators. In addition, she is passionate about supporting ecologists from underrepresented backgrounds through research mentorship and teaching.

Nolan Amon

M.S. Student

namon@wisc.edu

1630 Linden Dr
546 Russell Labs
Madison, WI 53706

As a graduate student in the Guédot lab, Nolan is currently working on studying the effect of supplemental wildflower plantings on native bee communities in Wisconsin cranberry agroecosystems. The yellow-banded bumble bee (Bombus terricola) is a highly effective pollinator for cranberry, and was formerly one of the most common bumble bees in and around Wisconsin cranberry marshes. However, the yellow-banded bumble bee has experienced precipitous declines over the last century. Using genetic data, he plans to examine how population sizes, genetic diversity, and levels of inbreeding in Bombus terricola have changed in Wisconsin over the past century, and how these genetic changes correlate with large-scale processes like agricultural intensification and climate change.

Jeremy Hemberger

PhD Candidate

hemberger@wisc.edu

1552 University Ave
3120 WEI
Madison, WI 53726

A student of Dr. Claudio Gratton, Jeremy’s research focuses on bumble bee behavior, colony performance, and population abundance as it relates to the amount of flowers available in the landscape.  He’s particularly interested in how agricultural land-use changes have affected flower abundance and the effect of those changes on wild bumble bees here in Wisconsin.  Using a variety of approaches including field/lab experiments and statistical modeling, Jeremy hopes to understand how to identify “good” landscapes for bumble bees so that we can work to conserve bee populations across the state.  Jeremy also constructed and manages this website.

Bumble Bee Research Groups

Gratton Lab

Research Group - Department of Entomology

1552 University Ave
3120 WEI
Madison, WI 53726

United by a passion for insects and ecology, members of the Gratton lab use innovative science to create fundamental knowledge that links insects, landscapes, and their conservation in support of healthy ecosystems and human well being.

Brunet Lab

Research Group - Department of Entomology

1630 Russell Labs
Madison, WI 53706

Coming soon!

Guedot Lab

Research Group - Department of Entomology

1630 Russell Labs
Madison, WI 53706

Coming soon!

Damschen Lab

Research Group - Department of Integrative Biology

145 Noland Hall
250 N. Mills St.
Madison, WI 53706

Coming soon!

UW Arboretum

1207 Seminole Highway
Madison, WI 53711

Coming soon!

Do you do bumble bee research at the UW?  If you do and are not featured on this page, contact us and we will get you added!